Medical Board of California News

Protecting consumers by advancing high quality, safe medical care.

Volume 153, Spring 2020

In This Issue

Editor’s Spotlight

President’s Message

Preparing for Secondary Health Effects of COVID-19

News to Use: A Primer on Telehealth Services

MBC Licensing Changes in the Age of COVID-19

Tech Med Corner: Virtual Reality Minimizes Reality of Fear and Anxiety for Kids

O’Connor Brings Experience, Leadership to MBC’s Licensing Unit

SB 425: Enhancing Consumer Protection

Caring For the Medically Underserved in California and Abroad, Dr. Sarah Zuger

Consumer Corner: Complaints and Consumer Protection

MBC’s Pending Legislation Webpage

Tech Med Corner: The Rise of Medical Drones

Getting to Know MBC’s Newest Executive Director

SB 697 Relaxes PA Supervision Rules

You Asked for It: Questions From the Web

News to Use: Coronavirus Surface Survival

Insights from the California Pregnancy-Associated Mortality Review

Medicine: A Lifelong Passion for One of MBC’s Expert Reviewers

Administrative Actions: November 1, 2019 – January 31, 2019

Links to Our Website

Update your address and phone number

Update your physician survey

Sign up for subscriber alerts

Contact us: webmaster@mbc.ca.gov

The Board’s Mission

The mission of the Medical Board of Californians to protect healthcare consumers through the proper licensing and regulation of physicians and surgeons and certain allied healthcare professionals and through the vigorous, objective enforcement of the Medical Practice Act, and to promote access to quality medical care through the Board’s licensing and regulatory functions.

Need a Speaker?

If you would like a speaker from the Medical Board of California to address your organization, please contact Public Affairs Manager Carlos Villatoro at: Carlos.Villatoro@mbc.ca.gov

The Medical Board of California News: A Publication of the Medical Board of California

Executive Director – William Prasifka

Deputy Director – Christine Lally

Staff Counsel – Kerrie Webb

Public Information Manager – Carlos Villatoro

Public Information Analyst – Alexandria Schembra

Editor Chief – Emmalee Ross

The Board’s headquarters is located at: 2005 Evergreen Street, Suite 1200, Sacramento, CA 95815.

The Medical Board of California News is typically published four times per year by the Medical Board of California.

All editions (Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall) are made available on the Board’s website.

Additionally, the Winter edition is printed in hard copy for distribution via US Postal Service to those physicians or interested parties without an email address or otherwise requested.

Submissions of originally written articles are welcome, but all submissions become the property of the Board and are subject to editing.

The Medical Board of California uses a subscriber service to notify individuals about items relating to the activities of the Medical Board via email. To subscribe or unsubscribe, please visit our website.

Please take a moment to share your thoughts about the Board’s newsletter. Do you have a particular section that you like, or an idea on how to improve our publication? We want to hear from you. Take the survey.

Editor's Spotlight

By Emmalee Ross

It is no surprise that the Spring of 2020 has not played out as healthcare workers and consumers imagined when the new year rolled around.

Since early March, California, along with the rest of the country, has faced a difficult environment with the onset of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19.

Although the Medical Board of California (Board), physicians and surgeons, and the community have faced trials every step of the way during the national pandemic, we continue to pull together, utilizing every resource possible to ensure the Board’s mission of consumer protection. I believe this is highly evident in the Medical Board of California News, Spring 2020 edition.

From the drastic changes the Board has temporarily adopted (page 8) to the “You Asked For It” column (page 22), we touch on many aspects of how COVID-19 is affecting the California healthcare system – including an article from California’s Surgeon General, Dr. Nadine Burke Harris (page 4).

Aside from COVID-19, I’m excited to introduce the Board’s new executive director, Bill Prasifka, as mentioned in the Board’s FallWinter 2020 edition. Learn about his interesting and unique history from his upbringing in Los Angeles to spending 30 years in Ireland, and his excitement and future intentions for the Board (page 18).

On behalf of the Board, I want to thank our brave healthcare workers across the state who have gone above and beyond while risking their lives to care for the community, not only during the COVID-19 outbreak, but every day. Sincerely, Emmalee Ross.

Top

President’s Message: Critical Times Call for Bold Actions

By Denise Pines

I hope this letter finds you and your loved ones safe and healthy. What extraordinary times we are living in! As we unite to beat COVID-19, also known as coronavirus, I am encouraged and inspired by big and small acts of kindness and sacrifice I see around us. I want to assure you we, here at the Medical Board of California (Board), are doing our part to respond to this historic threat to public health.

Since the outbreak of COVID-19, the Board has been working diligently with the Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) to ensure the state’s workforce is lined with willing and able physicians. In response to Governor Gavin Newsom’s proclamation of a State of Emergency in California, and subsequent Executive Order N-39-20, DCA issued temporary waivers pertaining to continuing medical education (CME) and license reinstatement requirements. The California Health Corps was then created to facilitate the process, to allow for a larger pool of healthcare professionals to serve during this critical time.

Californians answered the call. Within 24 hours of the website’s going live, more than 25,000 people signed up to volunteer. I am incredibly proud of our state’s commitment to eradicating this virus.

Please note:

  • Physicians and allied healthcare providers who hold a California retired, inactive, or, in some cases, canceled license can temporarily have their license restored to active without having to complete or demonstrate compliance with any CME requirements or pay any renewal, delinquency, penalty, or late fees, or any other statutory or regulatory fees.
  • Physicians and allied healthcare providers who hold an active license in California, and need to renew between March 31 and June 30, can temporarily waive the requirement to complete, or demonstrate compliance with any CME requirements.
  • In the early governor-defined Resilience Roadmap Stages, the Board transitioned most of its staff to telework ensuring their safety and well-being, while allowing the Board to provide its essential services to the state. The Board is currently following phase 3 state protocols as employees return to office environments.

While these are bold steps we’re taking, please understand they are also temporary. For more information about the waivers approved through DCA, please visit the DCA Waivers webpage.

As the COVID-19 situation continues to unfold in California, I encourage you to stay informed by signing up for the Board’s alerts. You can easily do this by visiting our website or downloading the Board’s free app for Apple iOS devices.

Stay safe and be well, Denise Pines

Top

Preparing for Secondary Health Effects of COVID-19

Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, California Surgeon General

The COVID-19 public health emergency is an unprecedented crisis, especially for our physicians and healthcare providers – both those directly treating COVID-19 and those working to ensure continuity of care for all other health conditions. To all of the providers who have sacrificed, volunteered, and stepped forward to meet this pandemic head on, thank you for your tireless commitment.

The health impacts of this pandemic go beyond the COVID-19 cases. Many patients are experiencing disruptions in their access to medications and care or are even delaying needed care out of fear of COVID-19. What’s more is that the stress caused by outbreak, the necessary physical distancing measures to slow the spread of the virus and the resulting distress due to lost wages, unemployment, and school closures are taking an intense toll on our brains and bodies. These secondary impacts will acutely affect the health and well-being of Californians in the weeks, months and years ahead.

Experience and research have demonstrated that crises including widespread communicable disease outbreaks (such as COVID-19) and natural disasters result in short- and long-term physical and mental health impacts, including increased cardiovascular, metabolic, immunologic, and neuropsychiatric risk. These result from disruption of access to care and the resources needed for health maintenance, as well as to overactivity of the biological stress response, also known as the toxic stress response.

Further, if we don’t act intentionally and inclusively, COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on vulnerable communities will worsen existing health, social, and economic disparities. For myriad and complex reasons, including increased exposure to cumulative adversity, communities of color have a higher rate of many underlying medical conditions that increase risk for serious COVID-19 infection. These include heart disease, high blood pressure, chronic lung diseases, diabetes, kidney disease, and some cancers.

Providers can help to address and mitigate negative health outcomes associated with toxic stress by responding with disaster-responsive, trauma-informed care, and treatment plans that also include measures to help regulate the stress response system.

It is vital that providers learn the signs and assess for toxic stress-related morbidity, including elevated blood pressure, increased Hemoglobin A1c, exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, immune dysregulation, and mental and behavioral health deterioration, which may increase risk for infection, autoimmune disorders, heart attack, stroke and other stress-related health conditions.

Further, providers can stay informed on the most current guidance and best practices and should support continuity and integration of medical and behavioral health services via telehealth and related adaptations in service delivery during the crisis. The Department of Health Care Services has specific guidance for Medi-Cal providers, including on Telehealth and Virtual/Telephonic Communications.

Launched earlier this year, the ACEs Aware initiative offers Medi-Cal providers training, clinical protocols, additional resources, and payment for screening children and adults for Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and responding with trauma-informed care. Individuals with a history of ACEs are especially vulnerable to negative health outcomes related to COVID-19. As a result, ACEs Aware has created and curated evidence-based clinical tools and resources specifically to support providers in recognizing and responding to stress-related morbidity and specific guidance on the topic in COVID-19 response.

In the weeks and months to come, identifying patients at risk for toxic stress and supplementing usual care with strategies to regulate the stress response system can yield highly impactful, life-saving results.

Top

News 2 Use: A Primer on Telehealth Services

By Emmalee Ross, Public Information Officer

During the rise of a national pandemic and the age of social distancing, telehealth has become a vital tool in maintaining appropriate attention to people and their healthcare needs.

Coronavirus itself absorbs most of our day-to-day thoughts and interactions, yet Californians have other health issues that they must address.

In light of this concern, many physicians have turned to telehealth in order to treat their patients for non-emergent health issues. In fact, telehealth-related questions are among the top inquiries received by the Medical Board of California (Board) from physicians all over the country since the middle of March 2020.

The Board refers physicians and the community to the Board’s Telehealth webpage and FAQ on Internet Prescribing for guidance on the use of telehealth in California. While physicians do not need to reside in California to conduct telehealth with a California-based patient, they must have a valid, current California license.

Governor Gavin Newsom recently signed Executive Order N-43-20, relaxing some requirements and expanding protections to medical providers to facilitate the use of telehealth to provide routine and non-emergency medical appointments. Further, insurance providers and other states are stepping up to do their part as well.

“On March 17, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services broadened access to Medicare telehealth services to reduce the number of people traveling to and from doctors’ offices and other clinical sites,” says a U.S. News & World Report article. “Other health insurers are also expanding the number and range of providers, conditions and situations where telehealth services will be covered. Some states are also expanding options for telehealth, all in the name of boosting social distancing and keeping people safe.”

U.S. News & World Report provides a helpful checklist for patients using telehealth for the first time:

  1. Make sure you have the right equipment, such as a smartphone, tablet, or computer with internet access.
  2. Check with your insurance company.
  3. Sit in a quiet, comfortable, well-lit place.
  4. Be aware the call might drop. This goes for both physicians and patients – have a plan if you get disconnected.
  5. Maximize your audio. Using earbuds or headphones can often improve the sound quality on both ends.
  6. Be patient. Especially if you’re new to using this kind of technology, it may take some time to get the hang of it.
  7. Arrive with an open mind. Don’t feel like you need to put your appointments on hold, physicians are available and ready to support their patients during this difficult time.

If you need any more tips or have any questions, please contact the Board at (916) 263-2394 or by email at webmaster@mbc.ca.gov.

Top

Wedding Bells in Your Future? Congratulations!

If your marriage involves a name change, please don’t forget to report it to the Medical Board of California within 30 days.

Visit our website for more information.

MBC Licensing Changes in the Age of COVID-19

By Carlos Villatoro, Public Information Officer

Almost as soon as the outbreak of COVID-19 enveloped much of the United States, the Medical Board of California (Board) began receiving coronavirus-related phone calls and emails from physicians throughout the country.

The Board continues to field questions regarding temporary licensure and various ways to contribute in the fight against coronavirus.

One of the most popular questions the Board receives is whether or not the Board can waive licensing fees and requirements in order for a physician or allied healthcare provider to be licensed and assist during the State of Emergency. Well, yes and no.

During the State of Emergency – which is to mean on a temporary basis – physicians and allied healthcare providers with a retired, inactive or canceled license can utilize a waiver that exempts them from paying licensing fees (including renewal, delinquency, penalty, late fees, or any other statutory or regulatory fee). Signed by Department of Consumer Affairs Director, Kimberly Kirchmeyer on March 31, 2020, the waiver also exempts these type of licensees from continuing medical education (CME) compliance requirements in an effort to get them back into the workforce to help California combat coronavirus.

Physicians and allied healthcare providers who already possess a California license and are eligible for renewal can use a waiver that temporarily exempts them from demonstrating compliance with required CME.

The aforementioned waivers exclude medical graduates who are undergoing medical training, medical students who have yet to graduate, or physicians or allied healthcare providers who are licensed in other states (unless they have been previously licensed in California, and voluntarily cancelled their license less than five years ago) seeking to practice in California.

Another common question that the Board receives is from California-licensed physicians and allied healthcare providers wanting to know how to assist during the State of Emergency. Recently, Governor Gavin Newsom launched an initiative to expand the California healthcare workforce with the creation of the California Health Corps.

The California Health Corps is actively recruiting physicians and other healthcare professionals (pharmacists, dentists, nurses and physician assistants to name a few) to join the fight against COVID-19 by registering online.

According to the California Health Corps website: “You will be paid and will be given malpractice insurance coverage. Locations will vary, but we will try to match your geographical preferences. You have the opportunity to play a critical role in responding to this public health emergency in your region. To care for Californians who need your help, please sign up.”

Physicians and allied healthcare providers who are licensed outside of California are also contacting the Board to find out how they too can help the state beat COVID-19. The Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA) is marshaling resources from outside of California to assist during COVID-19. While physicians who do not have a license in California are encouraged to apply for licensure on the Board’s website, EMSA is providing an online gateway that physicians and allied healthcare providers can use to temporarily help the state through this difficult time. Visit emsa.ca.gov/covid19 for further information.

Lastly, the Board has received numerous inquiries from medical graduates who are interested in receiving waivers for licensing requirements in California. The Board is aware of the tremendous need for physicians during this critical time and is working on solutions to address the needs of the state and provide consumer protection, which is its highest priority.

As the COVID-19 State of Emergency evolves in California, the Board is providing updates on its website, Twitter and Facebook pages and encourages physicians, allied healthcare providers, and other interested parties to sign up for subscriber alerts on the Board’s website.

If you have any further questions and wish to contact the Board, you can do so by calling toll free (800) 633-2322 or via email at webmaster@mbc.ca.gov.

Top

Tech Med Corner: Virtual Reality Minimizes Reality of Fear and Anxiety for Kids

By Emmalee Ross, Public Information Officer

A pediatric anesthesiologist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford in Palo Alto, California, is helping ease the minds of patients who may be dealing with what could be a traumatic experience for them – visiting the doctor’s office.

A concept engineered three years ago, Dr. Sam Rodriguez says virtual reality can be used as a “distraction-based intervention,” according to an online article published April 1, 2020, in HealthTech Magazine. By focusing on a fun and exciting virtual reality game, kids avert their attention from the actual procedure taking place.

The hospital provides about 70 virtual reality headsets, and according to Stanford Children’s Health, they are one of the only hospitals in the world to have virtual reality available on every unit.

“Virtual reality is one of the most exciting technologies that we can bring to bear for improved education and improved patient experience,” says Dr. Stephen Roth, chief of pediatric cardiology and director of the Betty Irene Moore Children’s Heart Center at Stanford Children’s Health.

Top

O’Connor Brings Experience, Leadership to MBC’s Licensing Unit

By Emmalee Ross, Public Information Officer

Having a conversation with Marina O’Connor, the Medical Board of California’s (Board) recently-appointed chief of licensing, feels like having a conversation with a friend.

A mom of 5-year-old twins, O’Connor downplays herself saying, “Gosh, I’m not a very exciting person,” after relaying that her life these days revolves around her work and family. Behind the humility, however, is a retired, semi-pro soccer player, sushi-lover, sports coach, marathon runner, world traveler and go-getter.

O’Connor has been with the Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) for over 10 years, and began her career with the Board in November 2019.

“It was a chance to work with a larger program,” says O’Connor on what interested her in the Board. “I knew the Medical Board had a lot of complex and critical issues, especially being in the public face.”

Bringing a wealth of experience to the Board, O’Connor previously worked as the licensing chief of the Bureau of Private Postsecondary Education within DCA, where she oversaw the licensing program, applications and renewals. Prior to working as licensing chief, O’Connor was the budget manager within the DCA Budget Office.

A Bay Area native, O’Connor began her career with DCA during graduate school when she moved to Sacramento in 2007 to pursue her masters’ degree in public policy and administration at California State University, Sacramento.

“I came with an open mind, wanting to try different things,” says O’Connor. “I’m of the mindset where you don’t know what you want until you try it.”

This mindset has served O’Connor well, especially with her desire to grow her career, adding extra-curriculars to her plate like joining the first cohort of DCA’s Future Leadership Program in 2018.

“If you want to move toward leadership in DCA, you have to be thinking big picture,” says O’Connor about the yearlong program. “That’s what interested me, gaining those leadership skills and experiences.”

While she puts her heart and soul into her work and staff, O’Connor and her husband, who also works for DCA, seem to have a handle on balancing priorities between their demanding jobs, raising twins, and everything else life throws at them with one simple trick.

“This is going to sound bad, but, survival day-to-day,” O’Connor says with a laugh. “I try not to overcommit, it’s important to make sure we have downtime at home, rather than committing to things every week.”

These days, O’Connor’s hobbies mainly revolve around her kids – swimming, hiking, biking, and coaching her twins’ soccer and softball teams – outdoorsy things. But before kids, and a back injury that put a halt on her most-loved activities, O’Connor was quite the athlete as a marathon runner, snowboarder, and semi-pro, indoor soccer player. However, she is determined to get back to those activities in the future.

A goal of hers is to rehabilitate her back. “It’s so sad to think living the rest of my life without being able to play soccer again,” says O’Connor, a season ticket holder for the Sacramento Republic FC.

Making plans for the summer with her family – camping at the top of the list – O’Connor, a sushi connoisseur, dreams of a child-less vacation to Japan one day.

“I’ve traveled internationally, but there’s just something different about Japan, I think it’s so beautiful,” says O’Connor. “And sushi? Yes please!’”

For now, O’Connor’s priority is to concentrate on the job at hand, implementing legislation that went into effect in 2020, having increased meaningful communication with physicians and medical programs, and improving processes and timelines.

“There’s so much to learn, I feel like there’s a lot more I can do for the Board, focusing on where we need to be with licensing.”

Top

SB 425: Enhancing Consumer Protection

By Emmalee Ross, Public Information Officer

A new law designed to enhance consumer protection from physicians who are accused of sexual abuse or misconduct, fills gaps in health facility reporting requirements to the Medical Board of California (Board).

Signed into law by Governor Gavin Newsom October 12, 2019, Senate Bill (SB) 425 (Hill), added section 805.8 to the Business and Professions Code, and requires health facilities and entities to report allegations of sexual abuse or sexual misconduct made against licensed healthcare professionals to the appropriate licensing agency. The law became effective January 1, 2020.

In accordance with the law, the patient allegation must be made in writing to the health facility or other entity to trigger the reporting requirements under the bill. It imposes a fine up to $100,000 per violation for willful failure to file the required report and specifies that any other failure to file the report is punishable by a fine not exceeding $50,000.

SB 425 also amended Business and Professions Code section 800, subdivision (c)(1), by striking the requirement for the Board to provide a “comprehensive” summary of a licensee’s central file upon the licensee’s request, and instead requires the Board to simply provide a summary.

The bill also amended Business and Professions Code section 2234, subdivision (g) to include in the definition of unprofessional conduct the failure of a licensee, in the absence of good cause, to attend and participate in an interview with the Board. Prior to this amendment, the law required the licensee’s failure to attend and participate in an interview with the Board to be repeated to fall within the definition of unprofessional conduct.

Finally, with the passing of SB 425, probationary license information will stay on the Board’s website for 10 years. Prior to this change, probationary license information came off of the licensee’s online profile as soon as the period of probation ended.

If you have any questions about SB 425, please call (800) 633-2322 or send an email to Webmaster@mbc.ca.gov.

Top

Caring for the Medically Underserved in California and Abroad

By Emmalee Ross, Public Information Officer

At 23 years old, Sarah Zuger spent her afternoons weighing babies in a village situated in one of the most rural areas of Mali, West Africa.

“I would have the chief of the village announce, ‘baby weighing at this time,’ and then everyone would come weigh their babies. It was a scale you’d hang in the tree, and then you would hang the baby on the scale,” Zuger laughs. “Pretty rudimentary, I guess.”

Zuger traded the greenery, foofy coffee drinks and wi-fi she had grown accustomed to as an undergraduate student at Western Washington State University for a bit of porridge and a heap of medical experience as a member of the Peace Corps.

“I didn’t expect to go in and save the village,” Zuger says. “My expectation was to learn about the people and the culture, and if I can do some good, then that’s a win. I went in with low expectations with how much of a difference I could make. I’m one person, who am I to say that I can radically change peoples’ lives?”

Never had that been so apparent to a young Dr. Zuger, now 37 and a family medicine specialist and primary care physician, then when an emergency arose in the village. The local doctor needed her help.

Weighing babies is tame work in the medical field – but assisting in saving the life of a Malian woman who was severely hemorrhaging after childbirth is something quite the opposite.

“There was blood all over the floor and the doctor was running around frantically,” Zuger says. “I was young and didn’t know anything, I just did what he told me.”

This wasn’t the last time Zuger would find herself with someone’s life in her hands. It was only the beginning.

Today, Zuger works in the rural town of Bishop, California, where she has been for the past three years. It was her transformative two years in West Africa, however, that ultimately set her on the path to medicine.

“I basically wanted to gain medical skills, but there’s a lot of similarities to Peace Corps with rural medicine in the sense that you’re working with a community and it’s not just about the medicine,” she says. “It’s about relationships with people.”

Zuger, a Steven M. Thompson Loan Repayment Program grant recipient, said she is the first in her family to pursue a career in medicine.

“My dad worked for Boeing, he was an industrial engineer, and my mom was an artist,” says Zuger.

Both parents were extremely supportive, valued learning and education, and had a love for science – which exposed Zuger to the idea of it at a young age. After graduating college, however, Zuger didn’t want to jump right into medical school, she wanted to make sure it was the right decision for her, which solidified her decision to join the Peace Corps.

While Bishop and Mali – roughly 6,800 miles away – are dissimilar in most ways, both are medically underserved areas and boast a strong sense of community.

“My favorite part of the job is being part of the community,” Zuger says. “I have families where I’m the doctor for four generations. That’s really rewarding – you get to know the family in a different context and different ways so you can provide better care. There’s so much psychosocial elements of health and you understand that so much better when you understand the family dynamics.”

The challenges and rewards of working in a rural setting are what Zuger loves about her career, and also, what allowed her to apply for and receive a grant from the Steven M. Thompson Loan Repayment Program in 2017 – a program created to increase health care access in medically underserved areas of California.

“It was a huge relief to get some assistance,” says Zuger about the grant. “I wouldn’t say it’s changed my career, I’ve always wanted to do rural family medicine, I’m just thankful to get some assistance.”

Bishop – the small town Zuger, her husband and two dogs, Pumpkin and Breeze, currently call home – is the ideal location for the couples’ love of rock climbing, back country snowboarding and skiing, and mountain biking.

“It’s a long path to becoming a doctor, it’s a lot of work and it’s easy to put everything else in your life aside,” she says, offering advice to those wanting to pursue medicine. “Continue to develop and start new hobbies and interests in medical school and residency – that would be my biggest advice.”

Top

Complaints Corner: Complaints and Consumer Protection

By Jaron Schrantz, Associate Governmental Program Analyst

“Are you going to do anything if I file a complaint?”

This is a very common question at the Medical Board of California’s (Board) call center. Consumers often express a certain futility with the complaint process, feeling that the Board will side with the doctor over the consumer no matter what. This sentiment may come from a perception that some doctors, in the past, “have gotten away with” negligence, unprofessionalism or worse – with the Board taking no action.

The reality, however, is that the Board protects consumers in ways they may never see. The Board’s concern for integrity in the healthcare system can be found in the rigors of the licensure process, before a doctor is even allowed to practice, as well as the thoroughness with which the Board treats all complaints received. In order to appreciate the Board’s role in consumer advocacy, it is important to understand where the Board’s authority begins.

The vast majority of complaints filed with the Board close before a field investigation launches. This is due to several reasons: allegation of the physician’s misconduct did not amount to a violation of the law; the quality of care provided was not considered a departure from the standard of care; or there is insufficient evidence to merit a formal investigation or pursuing administrative action.

For a case to be formally investigated, there has to be evidence that an egregious departure from the standard of care occurred, or that a similar case was filed. For an investigation to lead to Board discipline, which can include license suspension, probation, revocation, or a public reprimand, the Board must meet the burden of proof of ‘clear and convincing evidence to a reasonable certainty’ that the licensee has committed gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, unprofessional conduct, or is incompetent. Clear and convincing evidence is a high burden of proof that is just a notch below the burden of proof of beyond a reasonable doubt applied to criminal cases.

It is also important to note that the Board prioritizes complaints involving sexual misconduct, physician impairment (either physical or mental), substance abuse (drugs, alcohol), and overprescribing to name a few (Business and Professions Code 2220.05).

While the Board’s role is limited to the medical care provided to you by allopathic physicians (M.D.s) and a few allied healthcare professionals, the Board’s staff always strives to refer consumers to the right department or state entity if a question or complaint is outside of the Board’s jurisdiction.

One thing consumers should keep in mind is that the Board does not have authority over other healthcare issues such as hospital conditions or insurance matters. The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) largely regulates hospitals and clinics, although smaller, doctor-owned facilities may still fall under the purview of the Board. For issues with medical insurance or regulation of medical facilities outside of the Board’s jurisdiction, Board staff may refer consumers to the appropriate agency, such as, for example, the California Department of Managed Health Care , the Department of Health Care Services, or CDPH.

The easiest way to stay apprised of the Board’s disciplinary actions as they occur is to sign up on the Board’s website for Subscriber Alerts, to receive notifications for “Actions related to the license or practice of physicians and surgeons.” Daily updates are sent out to subscribers regarding new or updated disciplinary actions taken against licensees.

Another great way to remain apprised of your physician’s status is to download the Board’s free mobile app for Apple iOS devices. The mobile app allows users to ‘follow’ up to 16 physicians and sends alerts directly to your smart phone whenever there has been an update on the ‘followed’ physician’s license.

Staying informed on Board actions can make it easier to see that the Board’s goal of consumer protection is being met throughout our state each and every day.

Top

MBC’s Pending Legislation Webpage

The Medical Board of California (Board) launched a new web page in Spring 2019 focusing on pending legislation that affects the practice of medicine in California. Visitors can check out the Board’s position on bills being considered in the Legislature impacting the Board and its jurisdiction.

The Board may take positions on bills at quarterly meetings following discussion of analyses and staff recommendations as well as comments from members of the public who attend or call in to Board meetings.

Members of the public can also express support or opposition to a bill by contacting the author’s office or attending policy committee hearings in the Legislature. Visit the California Legislative Information website for hearing information.

The pending legislation web page will be updated before each quarterly Board meeting (see Meetings page) with a list of bills that will be discussed at the meeting. Links to the bill, author, title and Board position will be provided. Following the Board meeting, the list will be updated with the position taken by the Board on each bill.

For additional information, please contact the Board’s Executive Office at 916-263-2389.

Top

Tech Med Corner: The Rise of Medical Drones

By Emmalee Ross, Public Information Officer

Once upon a time, drones were an unrealistic aspect of the cartoon comedy, “The Jetsons.” In the not so distant future, however, drones could be an integral part of medical practice.

“With their speed and maneuverability, drones have long captured attention for their potential to deliver shopping orders and photograph the world from above,” says an online article in HealthTech Magazine. “But the machines can also serve a medical purpose by shuttling drugs, defibrillators and other equipment to emergency sites or care facilities.”

With technology constantly improving for drones including GPS and longer battery life, HealthTech Magazine says they are able to navigate obstacles including mountain ranges and road closures. They could also be an invaluable resource to underserved areas someday.

In light of this, UC San Diego Health, in partnership with UPS Flight Forward (flight commercial drone deliveries), began testing in mid-February to quickly transport medical samples to its facilities according to an online article in the Los Angeles Times.

Their goal is to improve patient experience, while reducing health costs by cutting delivery time from 20 to 30 minutes with traditional couriers, to three minutes via drone.

Of course, with new technology comes new risks. As with many delivery services, theft is a problem and medical drones are no different. HealthTech Magazine says another concern to be aware of is whether or not drones can handle sensitive cargo.

In its initial testing phase, UC San Diego is transporting dummy payloads between hospitals, and with success, will be moving on to medical samples, supplies, and records.

According to the Los Angeles Times, the Federal Aviation Administration has designated San Diego as a “special drone testing region” as more testing programs are expected to surface.

Top

Getting to Know MBC’s Newest Executive Director

By Emmalee Ross, Public Information Officer

After 32 years living and working abroad in Dublin, Ireland, Bill Prasifka is moving back to his native state of California for one particular reason – to join the Medical Board of California (Board) as its executive director effective June 2020.

“It’s a very important institution with a long history of being at the forefront of public-interest regulation,” says Prasifka on what drew him to the Board. “Because of its size, it’s a very influential body, and because of my ties to California, I wanted to come back home.”

Having an interesting career over the last 30 years in Ireland, Prasifka’s most recent position as the chief executive of the Medical Council in Dublin – regulating the country’s 23,000 physicians – made him an excellent candidate as the Board’s newest leader.

“The overall theme has to be public interest and patient safety,” says Prasifka, with a hint of Irish accent. “It is quite clear that patient safety and public protection are served by supporting doctors, and giving them guidance and clarity so they can do the job that they want to do.”

Prior to the Medical Council, Prasifka’s broad professional background as the commissioner for the Commission for Aviation Regulation from 1999-2005, chief executive officer/chair of the Competition Authority from 2006-2010, and the financial services ombudsman for Ireland’s Financial Services Ombudsman Bureau from 2010-2015, has prepared him to oversee the challenges of a healthcare system.

“Regulating the medical profession is quite complicated,” says Prasifka. “There will be a small number of cases where severe sanction is imposed, but for many other types of complaints, it’s quite obvious that what’s needed is a different type of approach.”

Believing that more and more cases should be solved in a non-adversarial fashion, Prasifka’s goal is to raise standards in order to improve standards.

“I think all medical boards are striving to meet that challenge,” he says.

Growing up in suburban Los Angeles, Prasifka took to debating in high school, which, combined with his love of history, current affairs, and politics, carved the path for him to attend one of the most prestigious law schools in the world, Columbia Law School.

“Going to New York City was quite a culture shock, but a transformational experience,” says Prasifka. “I love New York, I spent 12 years there – every opportunity I have to go to New York, I’ll visit.”

Not only was New York crucial for Prasifka’s career path, it just might have changed the trajectory of his life for reasons other than his education and career.

“My wife is Irish, we met in New York and she wanted to move back to Ireland,” says Prasifka, who now has three grown children. “I said, look, we’ll see how it goes – 30 years later, we were still in Ireland.”

While strolling down the familiar, cozy streets of Dublin, Prasifka says it’s impossible not to bump into somebody he knows.

“In Ireland, you cannot live anonymously,” he says of the things he is going to miss. “Everyone knows you, your job, what your children are doing – it’s just a very different kind of environment.”

Another tradition Prasifka holds near and dear are two American holidays he has come to celebrate with his Irish community, Fourth of July and Thanksgiving.

“In America, everyone goes home for Thanksgiving it’s a family event,” says Prasifka, who loves to cook and entertain. “In Ireland, everyone goes to Bill’s house for Thanksgiving.”

While finding change invigorating, Prasifka also recognizes the magnitude of change that comes with uprooting his life after 32 years.

“Ireland is a wonderful country, I‘ve had a great experience here,” he says.

Months before the move from Ireland to California, Prasifka’s country is going into lockdown, along with most of the world, as the novel coronavirus spreads throughout. Prasifka, however, still exudes excitement when talking about his future at the Board.

“I’m entirely focused on the challenges of the Medical Board of California,” he says. “To me, it’s quite an honor and privilege at this stage of my career to be given the opportunity to be a part of what is arguably one of the most important bodies in the world, in terms of the regulation of the medical profession.”

Top

SB 697 Relaxes PA Supervision Rules

By Carlos Villatoro, Public Information Manager

A new law that went into effect on January 1, 2020, has significantly changed the rules surrounding the supervision of physician assistants (PAs) in California.

Signed into law by Governor Gavin Newsom on Oct. 9, 2019, Senate Bill (SB) 697 (Caballero) replaces delegation of services agreements with practice agreements, but mandates physicians to provide adequate supervision as stipulated in the practice agreement. The bill also requires physicians and surgeons to be available, at a minimum, by telephone or other electronic communication methods at the time the PA examines the patient.

SB 697 also removed the requirements that the medical record identify the responsible supervising physician and surgeon and that those written guidelines for adequate supervision be established. The bill , instead, authorizes a PA to perform medical services authorized by the act if certain requirements are met, including that the medical services are rendered pursuant to a practice agreement, and the PA is competent to perform the medical services.

SB 697 requires a practice agreement between a PA and a physician and surgeon to meet specified requirements, and requires a practice agreement to establish policies and procedures to identify a physician and surgeon supervising a PA rendering services in a general acute care hospital.

In regard to prescribing, the law authorizes a PA to furnish or order a drug or device subject to specified requirements, including that the furnishing or ordering be in accordance with the practice agreement and consistent with the PA’s educational preparation or for which clinical competency has been established and maintained, and that the physician and surgeon be available by telephone or other electronic communication method at the time the physician assistant examines the patient.

In addition, the bill authorizes PAs to furnish or order Schedule II or III controlled substances in accordance with the practice agreement or a patient-specific order approved by the treating or supervising physician and surgeon. If you have any questions about SB 697, please call the Board at 800-633-2322 or send an email to webmaster@mbc.ca.gov.

Top

MBC Needs You!

If you are currently practicing in California, the Medical Board of California (Board) needs your help as an expert reviewer. The Board is currently looking for physical and mental examiners, clinical diagnostic examiners, and psychologists.

For information and how to apply, please visit: our website or contact the Board’s expert reviewer program at: MBCMedicalExpertProgram@mbc.ca.gov

Psychologists

Psychologists actively practicing in California with experience performing fitness-for-duty evaluations are also encouraged to apply. Minimum Requirements: California psychology license in good standing; have an active practice with at least three years of experience in conducting fitness-for-duty evaluations; no current complaints; no prior discipline; and must be willing and available to testify. To apply, forward your most current curriculum vitae to MBCMedicalExpertProgram@mbc.ca.gov.

Clinical Diagnostic Examiners

If the Board orders a licensee who is on probation due to a substance abuse problem to undergo a clinical diagnostic evaluation, the Board needs physicians and surgeons with at least three years of experience in providing evaluations of physicians and surgeons with substance abuse disorders to conduct the evaluation. Physicians with addiction expertise are urged to apply.

Physical and Mental Examiners

If there is concern a physician cannot practice medicine safely due to a physical or mental condition, the Board needs examiners to conduct the evaluation. Physicians and surgeons from various specialties are urged to apply especially those practicing in the fields of psychiatry, neurology, internal medicine, family medicine, addiction medicine, and other specialties. Applications from all disciplines are accepted continuously.

Compensation Rates

Examiners’ usual/customary fee for the examination and any necessary testing; Board’s expert rate of compensation for record review/report.

Minimum Requirements

Physicians must be board certified; have been practicing their specialty for a minimum of three years after board certification; have no current complaints; no prior discipline; and must be willing and available to testify.

Top

You Asked For It: Questions From the Web Covid-19 Edition

By Alexandria Schembra, Public Information Analyst

Question: In this time of need, I would like to assist however I can. I was disciplined and my license has been revoked. How can I reactivate my license and help out?

Answer: Currently, the waivers provided by the Department of Consumer Affairs do not apply to any license that was surrendered or revoked pursuant to disciplinary proceedings or any individual who entered a retired, inactive, or canceled status following initiation of a disciplinary proceeding. At this time, there have been no changes to the Section 2307 Board’s policies pertaining to license re-instatement after revocation. Business and Professions Code sections 2221(b) and 2307 allow an individual whose license has been surrendered, revoked or suspended to petition the Medical Board of California for reinstatement of the license or modification of the penalty. Section 2307 also authorizes an individual whose license is on probation, due to either a disciplinary action taken by the Board or because the license was issued on probationary status, to petition the Board to modify or terminate previously imposed terms and conditions or to request that the Board terminate the probation early.

Question: I have applied for a California medical license. In order to assist with patients during the pandemic, I’d like my license as soon as possible. Are you expediting licenses for applicants who are available to assist?

Answer: Requirements for licensure have not changed at this time. The Board reviews applications in the order in which they are received. You cannot pay a fee to expedite the review of your application. When deciding when to apply, please allow sufficient time for all your documents to be received and reviewed by the Board, particularly if you have a deadline for licensure or are applying for a postgraduate training license (PTL).

Question: I own a small practice and am running out of masks and tests. Where do I get more?

Answer: The Board does not provide masks and tests. Please contact the California Department of Public Health or your local department of public health for information on how to obtain additional supplies for your practice.

Top

News to Use: Coronavirus Surface Survival

By Emmalee Ross, Public Information Officer

Before March 2020, I lived in a world of innocence. Yes, I practiced good public hygiene by washing my hands regularly, using the bottle of hand sanitizer on my desk at work occasionally, and always covering my nose and mouth when I sneezed. But never before had I thought about the possibility of death by virus every time I opened a door, stood too closely to someone at Trader Joes, or held my wire-haired terrier – wondering what her little paws had come in contact with outside.

Never before had I thought about the amount of time a virus can stay on my skin, clothes, bottom of my shoes, grocery bags, water bottle, car door, etc. Now I think about it every day, probably hundreds of times a day.

“Viruses didn’t become ubiquitous by being wimps: From the rhinoviruses that cause the common cold to the new coronavirus that has spread across the world, they are able to survive on surfaces far away from the living cells that they need in order to reproduce,” says an online article by statnews.com.

But just how long can the coronavirus survive? It all depends on the type of surface.

A study published by the New England Journal of Medicine on March 17, 2020, tested the deposit of coronavirus on different types of surfaces to evaluate the amount of virus left on the surface after varying times.

According to the study, “SARS-CoV-2 (coronavirus) was more stable on plastic and stainless steel than on copper and cardboard, and viable virus was detected up to 72 hours after application to these surfaces.”

On copper, however, the study showed no viable coronavirus after four hours, and there was no viable coronavirus on cardboard after 24 hours.

Chief scientific officer of the American Association of Medical Colleges told statnews.com, “You have to get a certain level of the virus exposure to be infected.”

He said that the infection cannot happen through skin, but rather it enters the body through mucus membranes such as the nose or eyes. This is why not touching your face when in public is so important, and thoroughly washing your hands after touching surfaces is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your loved ones against infection.

As the flowers bloom and a new season unfolds, I resist the urge to rub my allergy-suffering eyes. The curtain has lifted, the innocence is gone.

Top

Insights from the California Pregnancy-Associated Mortality Review

California Department of Public Health: Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Division

In 2000, California began seeing a rise in the maternal mortality ratio, which increased from 7.7 per 100,000 live births in 1999, to 16.9 in 2006.

“In California…we didn’t know what was exactly contributing to this rise,” said Dr. Connie Mitchell, Deputy Director of the Center for Family Health at the California Department of Public Health (CDPH).

CDPH formed a team of maternal health specialists representing its Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Division, Stanford University’s California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, and the Public Health Institute, along with a voluntary expert review committee, to investigate the problem.

Mitchell and her colleagues began poring through the medical records of the women who died before or within one year after childbirth. What the team discovered was that cardiovascular disease was the leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths in 2002-2007.

This was but one of the crucial findings the California Pregnancy Associated Mortality Review (CA-PAMR) discovered during the investigation. CA-PAMR’s report on obstetric deaths highlighted several other trends that gave public health professionals a sense of what was happening to pregnant mothers in California and provided a roadmap to help curb maternal mortality.

Formed in 2006 with the use of Title V Funds, CA-PAMR’s in-depth examination of deaths while pregnant, or within one year of pregnancy, sought to identify the cause and timing of death, pregnancy-relatedness, contributing factors, and improvement opportunities in maternity care and support with the ultimate goal of eliminating preventable pregnancy-related deaths and associated health disparities.

Using the considerable data gathered through the investigation, CA-PAMR developed maternal health toolkits and collaborated with obstetrical hospitals and maternal health providers throughout the state to share the review findings, talk about maternal health improvement opportunities, and implement the maternal health toolkits. Through these efforts and numerous partnerships formed, CA-PAMR dramatically lowered the maternal mortality ratio in California; in contrast, nationally, the ration continued to rise.

CA-PAMR’s comprehensive case reviews have provided recommendations, translational activities – including the California Maternal Quality Improvement Toolkits , hospital learning collaboratives, and provider/public education.

Here are some key findings and recommendations from released CA-PAMR reports (available at www.cdph.ca.gov/PAMR.aspx):

Obstetric Deaths, 2002-2007

  • Cardiovascular disease was the leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths.
  • The rate of maternal deaths for black women was three-to-four times higher compared with other racial/ethnic groups, despite an overall reduction in maternal mortality.
  • Forty-one percent of obstetric deaths had a good-to-strong chance of prevention with missed opportunities to intervene.
  • Multiple patient, provider, and facility factors contributed to pregnancy-related deaths; common factors included co-morbidities, especially obesity and hypertension; delayed recognition and response to clinical warning signs; and a lack of institutional readiness for obstetric emergencies.

Recommendations:

  • Increase awareness of the risk factors prevalent among black women, such as cardiovascular symptoms.
  • Be vigilant about women entering pregnancy with chronic health conditions and help them to attain optimal health.
  • Consider social and economic factors when evaluating effective care and in anticipating the health needs of pregnant and postpartum women.
  • Improve provider and hospital care, including standardized protocols, planning and communication, as well as issues of overuse of cesarean sections and induction.
  • Improve communication and coordination within, and across, hospital departments where pregnant and postpartum women seek care.

Maternal Suicide, 2002-2012

  • Pre-existing and new onset mental health conditions were highly prevalent among women who died from suicide within one year of pregnancy.
  • Psychosocial stressors were common near the time of death, such as conflicts with partner/family, pregnancy loss, or removal of children from mothers.
  • Substance use overlapped with mental health conditions and was deemed a possible coping mechanism.
  • Most suicides occurred after maternity care ended; 51 percent had a good-to-strong chance of prevention.

Recommendations:

  • Improve coordination between obstetric care and psychiatry/mental health regarding treatment when indicated.
  • Improve screening for mental health conditions during and after pregnancy, and screening for substance use, adverse childhood experiences, and intimate partner violence.
  • Provide pregnancy and postpartum care/support related to pregnancy loss or removal of children from mothers.
  • Provide partners/family with culturally and linguistically appropriate information and support regarding their loved one’s mental illness.

For further information or questions, please contact: Dr. Paula Krakowiak, CA-PAMR Project Lead, at Paula.Krakowiak@cdph.ca.gov or (916) 650-0364.

Top

Medicine: A Lifelong Passion for One of MBC’s Expert Reviewers

By Emmalee Ross, Public Information Officer

As a child, Dr. William Kenneth Mora never doubted the career path he wanted to pursue.

“My father was a physician,” says Mora, who now has grown children and grandchildren of his own. “I experienced it first-hand with the stories he brought home.”

Following in his father’s footsteps, Mora has practiced medicine for over 30 years, and has served as an expert reviewer for the Medical Board of California (Board) for 20 years and counting.

Expert reviewers such as Mora are a critical component of the Board’s enforcement process and help the Board meet its mission of consumer protection.

Graduating from the University of California Davis School of Medicine in 1985, Mora established his practice in Sacramento almost 20 years ago where it has evolved from family medicine into integrative medicine.

“Integrative medicine is addressing nutrition and the root causes of disease, not just simply treating the symptoms,” says Mora, who treats patients of all ages. “What I enjoy is the satisfaction of watching health transformation and improvement through diet, nutrition, exercise and better sleep.”

Mora joined the Board’s Expert Reviewer Program almost five years after its inception in 1994. The program was created for physicians of all specialties to provide impartial and professional reviews on cases supporting the Board’s investigation and enforcement functions.

Wanting to share his knowledge on a specialty that had far fewer physicians than other specialties at the time, Mora decided to become an expert reviewer for the Board after reading about the opportunity in a California Family Physician magazine.

“I found there was a need for medical expert reviewers for people practicing the type of medicine I practiced,” says Mora. “I thought I could help.”

As an expert reviewer, Mora evaluates a wide range of cases for the Board, including complaints of inadequate examinations before prescribing medications, overprescribing medications, sexual misconduct, and cases with a lack of informed consent.

Mora believes the challenging cases are what make the work interesting and satisfying.

“Sometimes it’s not straight forward, but you have to do critical thinking and research,” he says. “Being a reviewer for the Medical Board keeps you current on not only state laws involving medicine, but also the current practice of medicine.”

Expert reviewers are compensated by the Board for their time, and while physicians are regularly offered opportunities to review cases, they are not obligated to accept them all.

“I encourage physicians to volunteer to do this kind of work,” says Mora. “I think it makes you a better physician if you’re an expert reviewer in your own field. Anyone can be a part of this.”

For the time being, Mora, who enjoys exploring the Sierra Foothills with his wife and border collies, plans to continue his Sacramento-based practice at Health Associates Medical Group while also assisting the Board with his experience, knowledge, and passion.

“Medicine is lifelong learning for me,” he says. “I think it would be hard to retire.”

If you’re a physician looking to use your skills and passion as an expert reviewer for the Medical Board of California, please visit us at our website or email the Board’s expert program at MBCMedicalExpertProgram@mbc.ca.gov for more information.

Top

Administrative Actions: November 1, 2019 – January 31, 2019

Physicians and Surgeons

ABARBANEL, ANDREW MICHAEL (G 47490), ROCHESTER, MN

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of four patients; excessive prescribing in the care and treatment of two patients; and incompetence in the care and treatment of two patients. Surrender of License. November 8, 2019. View the decision and the order for Abarbanel, Andrew Michael (G 47490) on the Board's website.

ARCERITO, MASSIMO, M.D. (A 111450), Riverside, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an education course. Public Reprimand. January 2, 2020. View the decision and the order for Arcerito, Massimo, M.D. (A 111450) on the Board's website.

ASHOKAN, ANNAMALAI (A 43142), Hollister, CA

No admissions but charged with unprofessional conduct and repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of one patient; unprofessional conduct, gross negligence and sexual misconduct in the care and treatment of one patient. Surrender of License. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Ashokan, Annamalai (A 43142) on the Board's website.

BASS, MICHAEL PERRY (C 32503), Rancho Cordova, CA

Physician has a condition affecting his ability to practice medicine safely. Surrender of License. November 8, 2019. View the decision and the order for Bass, Michael Perry (C 32503) on the Board's website.

BATES, PAIGE CATHERINE, M.D. (A 167074), Stanford, CA

No admissions but charged with having professionalism issues during her postgraduate training program, with timely completion of documentation. Probationary license issued, placed on thirty-five months’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, during the first year of probation she is prohibited from practicing medicine outside an ACGME accredited postgraduate training and must successfully complete 12 months of ACGME accredited postgraduate training in the same training, complete a medical records course, and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 16, 2019. View the decision and the order for Bates, Paige Catherine, M.D. (A 167074) on the Board's website.

BESHAY, ISAAC NAGEEB, M.D. (A 89039), Costa Mesa, CA

No admissions but charged with failing to adequately manage and document the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete a prescribing practices course and a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Beshay, Isaac Nageeb, M.D. (A 89039) on the Board's website.

BREDY, BRUNEL, M.D. (A 75486), Elk Grove, CA

No admissions but convicted of one misdemeanor count of disturbing the peace and using drugs and alcohol in a manner as to be dangerous or injurious to himself, another person, or to the public. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, abstaining from the use of alcohol; submitting to biological fluid testing; completing an education course and an ethics course; submitting to a psychiatric evaluation; submitting to a medical evaluation and treatment; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. January 10, 2020. View the decision and the order for Bredy, Brunel, M.D. (A 75486) on the Board's website.

BROWN, GEORGE ERWIN, JR., M.D. (C 154843), Houston, TX

Disciplined by Texas for failure to supervise advanced practice nurses effectively. Must complete a prescribing practices course. Public Reprimand. January 29, 2020. View the decision and the order for Brown, George Erwin, Jr., M.D. (C 154843) on the Board's website.

BROWN, STANLEY K., M.D. (C 42176), Scottsdale, AZ

Disciplined by Arizona for providing substandard care and treatment to one patient. Must complete a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. January 9, 2020. View the decision and the order for Brown, Stanley K., M.D. (C 42176) on the Board's website.

BUTTAR, KULWANT KAUR, M.D. (C 52245), Buffalo, NY

Resigned from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, Canada, during an investigation. Dr. Buttar has agreed never to apply or reapply for registration as a physician in Ontario. Must complete a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. December 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Buttar, Kulwant Kaur, M.D. (C 52245) on the Board's website.

CHESLER, BRADLEY HOWARD, M.D. (A 43963), Escondido, CA

Committed acts of unprofessional conduct, gross negligence and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of five patients; repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of four patients; excessive prescribing in the care and treatment of three patients; prescribing without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication in the care and treatment of two patients; incompetence in the care and treatment of one patient; and violated statutes regulating dangerous drugs or controlled substances. Revoked, stayed, placed on three years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an education course, a prescribing practices course, a medical record keeping course, a clinical competence assessment program; obtaining a practice monitor; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 6, 2019. View the decision and the order for Chesler, Bradley Howard, M.D. (A 43963) on the Board's website.

CHETTY, ROHIT, M.D. (A 166909), Chatsworth, CA

Charged with having performance deficiencies during postgraduate training. Probationary license issued, placed on three years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, successfully completing a clinical competence assessment program, obtaining a practice monitor, prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine, and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Chetty, Rohit, M.D. (A 166909) on the Board's website.

CHOW, NORMAN YUH WEI (A 34003), Diamond Bar, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence in the care and treatment of four patients; repeated negligent acts and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of five patients; and incompetence in the care and treatment of one patient. Surrender of License. January 21, 2020. View the decision and the order for Chow, Norman Yuh Wei (A 34003) on the Board's website.

CHUN, MICHAEL LEWIS, M.D. (G 68978), Roseville, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence and repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an education course. Public Reprimand. January 10, 2020. View the decision and the order for Chun, Michael Lewis, M.D. (G 68978) on the Board's website.

COLE, WENDY ANNE, M.D. (A 75088), Novato, CA

Admitted to having a condition affecting her ability to practice medicine safely, unprofessional conduct and using drugs in a manner as to be dangerous to herself, another person, or to the public. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, abstaining from the use of controlled substances and alcohol, completing an ethics course, attending psychotherapy, prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine, prohibited from practicing medicine during overnight shifts and from working more than forty (40) hours a week, completing a clinical diagnostic evaluation, notification of employer, submitting to biological fluid testing, attending substance abuse support group meetings, obtaining a worksite monitor, and notification to patients of probation status. January 16, 2020. View the decision and the order for Cole, Wendy Anne, M.D. (A 75088) on the Board's website.

DAVIDSON, DONALD DALE, M.D. (A 137144), Las Vegas, NV

Admitted to repeated negligent acts, failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records and unprofessional conduct in the care and treatment of three patients. Revoked, stayed, placed on three years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an education course, a prescribing practices course and a medical record keeping course; obtaining a practice monitor; prohibited from writing and issuing medical marijuana recommendations for the first year of probation; submitting proof of notification of Decision and Accusation to the required parties; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. January 10, 2020. View the decision and the order for Davidson, Donald Dale, M.D. (A 137144) on the Board's website.

DENENNY, DAVID MILTON (G 31715), West Plains, MO

Surrendered his medical license to the Missouri State Board of Registration for the Healing Arts. No admissions but charged with unprofessional conduct in his care and treatment of three patients. Revoked. November 22, 2019. View the decision and the order for Denenny, David Milton (G 31715) on the Board's website.

DESAI, ASHISH VIRENDRA, M.D. (A 90144), Ventura, CA

No admissions but charged with unprofessional conduct and repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of two patients; and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an education course. Public Reprimand. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Desai, Ashish Virendra, M.D. (A 90144) on the Board's website.

DESOUZA, BLAISE PHILIP VINC (A 37917), Foresthill, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of four patients and excessive prescribing in the care and treatment of one patient. Surrender of License. December 12, 2019. View the decision and the order for Desouza, Blaise Philip Vinc (A 37917) on the Board's website.

DEUTSCH, DAVID PAUL, M.D. (G 83289), Beverly Hills, CA

Admitted to gross negligence and repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an ethics course and an education course. Public Reprimand. January 3, 2020. View the decision and the order for Deutsch, David Paul, M.D. (G 83289) on the Board's website.

DUPONT, RENEE M., M.D. (A 42799), Encinitas, CA

Admitted to being convicted of a misdemeanor count of driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage while having a blood alcohol level above .15 percent, used alcohol in a manner as to be dangerous or injurious to herself, another person, or to the public. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, abstaining from the use of alcohol; completing an ethics course and clinical diagnostic evaluations; attending psychotherapy; notification of employer; submitting to biological fluid testing; attending substance abuse support group meetings; obtaining a worksite monitor for substance abusing licensees; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Dupont, Renee M., M.D. (A 42799) on the Board's website.

EDRICH, LESLIE HOWARD, M.D. (G 48000), Long Beach, CA

No admissions but charged with repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an education course. Public Reprimand. January 16, 2020. View the decision and the order for Edrich, Leslie Howard, M.D. (G 48000) on the Board's website.

ESTRADA, JOHN JOE (C 27180), Los Angeles, CA

No admissions but charged with repeated negligent acts, false statement in medical records, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Surrender of License. January 30, 2020. View the decision and the order for Estrada, John Joe (C 27180) on the Board's website.

ETTA, BYRON, M.D. (A 166911), Orange, CA

No admissions but charged with having issues during his postgraduate training program relating to professionalism, communication, and patient care. Probationary license issued, placed on three years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, during the first year of probation he is prohibited from practicing medicine outside an ACGME accredited postgraduate training and must successfully complete 12 months of ACGME accredited postgraduate training in the same training; obtain a practice monitor; complete an ethics course and a clinician-patient communication course; prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine; submitting proof of notification of Decision to required parties; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Etta, Byron, M.D. (A 166911) on the Board's website.

FELDMAR, DAVID AARON, M.D. (A 87326), Beverly Hills, CA

Admitted to aiding and abetting the unlicensed practice of medicine, repeated negligent acts and failing to obtain a fictitious name permit; and made no admissions but charged with gross negligence and prescribing without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication in the care and treatment of one patient. Revoked, stayed, placed on thirty-five months’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an education course; an ethics course; prohibited from supervising allied health practitioners in cosmetic procedures for one year; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 18, 2019. View the decision and the order for Feldmar, David Aaron, M.D. (A 87326) on the Board's website.

FULLEMANN, SUSAN LOUISE, M.D. (G 51875), Burlingame, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of two patients. Revoked, stayed, placed on four years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, prohibited from ordering, prescribing dispensing, administering, or furnishing any Schedule II or III controlled substances until successful completion of a prescribing practices course; maintaining a record of all controlled substances ordered, prescribed, dispensed, administered, or possessed and any recommendations or approvals to possess or cultivate marijuana; completing an education course, a prescribing practices course; a medical record keeping course; obtaining a practice monitor; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 8, 2019. View the decision and the order for Fullemann, Susan Louise, M.D. (G 51875) on the Board's website.

GINSBURG, MARVIN L., M.D. (G 10816), Lancaster, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of two patients. Revoked, stayed, placed on three years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an education course, a medical record keeping course, and shall not engage in the clinical practice of medicine until successfully completing a clinical competence assessment program; obtaining a practice monitor; prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. January 10, 2020. View the decision and the order for Ginsburg, Marvin L., M.D. (G 10816) on the Board's website.

HANDLEY, ERWIN CALDWELL, JR. (A 48463), Del Mar, CA

Unable to satisfy the terms and conditions of his Board-ordered probation. Surrender of License. January 8, 2020. View the decision and the order for Handley, Erwin Caldwell, Jr. (A 48463) on the Board's website.

HODNETT, RICHARD MCINNIS, M.D. (C 51707), Thousand Oaks, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, failure to supervise medical assistant, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an education course and a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. December 13, 2019. View the decision and the order for Hodnett, Richard Mcinnis, M.D. (C 51707) on the Board's website.

HURM, RAYMOND ANTHONY (A 150498), Coronado, CA

Unable to satisfy the terms and conditions of his Board-ordered probation. Surrender of License. December 3, 2019. View the decision and the order for Hurm, Raymond Anthony (A 150498) on the Board's website.

HYLTON, DIANA JEAN, M.D. (A 41225), Merced, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence in the care and treatment of one patient and repeated negligent acts and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of six patients. Revoked, stayed, placed on three years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, maintaining a record of all controlled substances ordered, prescribed, dispensed, administered, or possessed and any recommendations or approvals to possess or cultivate marijuana; completing an education course, a prescribing practices course, and a medical record keeping course; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 18, 2019. View the decision and the order for Hylton, Diana Jean, M.D. (A 41225) on the Board's website.

JANDA, JOHN P. S. (A 37510), Fresno, CA

Unable to satisfy the terms and conditions of his Board-ordered probation. Surrender of License. November 1, 2019. View the decision and the order for Janda, John P. S. (A 37510) on the Board's website.

JANES, JEFFERSON OCHSNER (G 23520), Nevada City, CA

Admits to being convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol on two occasions; used alcohol in such a manner as to be dangerous or injurious to himself, another person, or to the public. Surrender of License. December 20, 2019. View the decision and the order for Janes, Jefferson Ochsner (G 23520) on the Board's website.

KASABALI, BASEL, M.D. (A 49814), Benton, LA

Committed acts of dishonesty by failing to disclose on his application for licensure a malpractice claim that had been previously filed against him. Public Reprimand. November 22, 2019. View the decision and the order for Kasabali, Basel, M.D. (A 49814) on the Board's website.

KASCHAK, THOMAS JOSEPH (G 67586), Stateline, NV

Failed to comply with multiple terms of his Board-ordered probation. Revoked. January 10, 2020. View the decision and the order for Kaschak, Thomas Joseph (G 67586) on the Board's website.

KELLER, THOMAS MCNEESE (G 27288), Santa Rosa, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, excessive prescribing, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of five patients. Surrender of License. November 25, 2019. View the decision and the order for Keller, Thomas Mcneese (G 27288) on the Board's website.

KELLY, DENNIS ALAN (G 26518), Santa Monica, CA

Physician has a condition affecting his ability to practice medicine safely. Surrender of License. January 30, 2020. View the decision and the order for Kelly, Dennis Alan (G 26518) on the Board's website.

KERNBERG, MARTIN EDWIN, M.D. (G 62629), San Francisco, CA

Admitted to failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of four patients. Must complete a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. November 8, 2019. View the decision and the order for Kernberg, Martin Edwin, M.D. (G 62629) on the Board's website.

KHORASHADI, FARHAD, M.D. (A 75718), San Diego, CA

Admitted to being convicted of two misdemeanor counts of driving under the influence of alcohol and concurrently doing an act forbidden by law, or neglecting a duty imposed by law in driving the vehicle, which act or neglect proximately caused bodily injury to a person, driving with a blood alcohol level of .08 percent or more, and used alcohol in a manner as to be dangerous or injurious to himself, another person, or to the public. Revoked, stayed, placed on three years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, abstaining from the use of alcohol, submitting to biological fluid testing, completing an ethics course, obtaining a psychiatric evaluation, and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 20, 2019. View the decision and the order for Khorashadi, Farhad, M.D. (A 75718) on the Board's website.

KHUNGAR, POOJA, M.D. (A 94561), Chicago, IL

Charged with being disciplined by Illinois for engaging in dishonorable, unethical, or unprofessional conduct of a character likely to deceive, defraud, or harm the public. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an ethics course, submitting to a psychiatric evaluation, obtaining a practice monitor, prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine, and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 2, 2019. View the decision and the order for Khungar, Pooja, M.D. (A 94561) on the Board's website.

KIM, DANIEL YOUNG SOON, M.D. (G 55909), Laguna Niguel, CA

Admitted to gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an education course and a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. January 10, 2020. View the decision and the order for Kim, Daniel Young Soon, M.D. (G 55909) on the Board's website.

KIM, RICHARD BYOUNG SOO, M.D. (A 107769), Irvine, CA

No admissions but convicted of making criminal threats and discharging a firearm with gross negligence. Revoked, stayed, placed on seven years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, 45 day suspension beginning the 16th day after the effective day of this decision; providing 120 hours of free services to a community or non-profit organization; completing an education course in anger management and an ethics course; submitting to a psychiatric evaluation; attending psychotherapy; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 18, 2019. View the decision and the order for Kim, Richard Byoung Soo, M.D. (A 107769) on the Board's website.

KOMATIREDDY, RAVICHANDRA (A 104776), San Diego, CA

No admissions but convicted of three felony counts of obtaining and unlawfully using the personal identifying information of another; and charged with having a condition affecting his ability to practice medicine safely, dishonest acts, prescribing with intent to divert for self-use, and false representation. Surrender of License. November 8, 2019. View the decision and the order for Komatireddy, Ravichandra (A 104776) on the Board's website.

LAZCANO, OSCAR DANIEL, M.D. (A 166958), Visalia, CA

Admitted to unprofessional conduct and incompetence during his out-of-state anesthesiology residency program, where he was distracted and was underperforming. He failed to follow his academic probationary terms. He eventually resigned from the program. Probationary license issued, placed on four years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an education course and shall not practice medicine until he successfully completes a clinical competence assessment program; prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 4, 2019. View the decision and the order for Lazcano, Oscar Daniel, M.D. (A 166958) on the Board's website.

LEE, DONALD WOO (A 56294), Temecula, CA

Admitted to gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records, violating statutes regulating drugs, and dishonest acts in the care and treatment of two patients; and unable to satisfy the term and condition of his Board-ordered probation. Surrender of License. November 7, 2019. View the decision and the order for Lee, Donald Woo (A 56294) on the Board's website.

LEE, JAMES C., M.D. (A 126831), San Francisco, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of individuals. Must complete a prescribing practices course and a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. December 18, 2019. View the decision and the order for Lee, James C., M.D. (A 126831) on the Board's website.

LIANG, PETER CHI-YUE (A 75106), Austin, TX

Unable to satisfy the terms and conditions of his Board-ordered probation. Surrender of License. December 4, 2019. View the decision and the order for Liang, Peter Chi-Yue (A 75106) on the Board's website.

LIEBERFARB, MONTE I. (G 57801), Willits, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Surrender of License. November 13, 2019. View the decision and the order for Lieberfarb, Monte I. (G 57801) on the Board's website.

LOWE, STANLEY, D.P.M. (E 3480), San Marino, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts and unprofessional conduct in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an education course and pay cost recovery. Public Reprimand. November 20, 2019. View the decision and the order for Lowe, Stanley, D.P.M. (E 3480) on the Board's website.

MADRID, MARTHA, M.D. (G 75760), Bakersfield, CA

No admissions but charged with prescribing without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication, gross negligence, and repeated negligent acts, creating false medical records and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of seven patients. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, 15 day suspension (Condition Met), maintaining a record of all controlled substances ordered, prescribed, dispensed, administered, or possessed and any recommendations or approvals to possess or cultivate marijuana; completing an education course, a prescribing practices course, a medical record keeping course, and an ethics course; obtaining a practice monitor; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 13, 2019. View the decision and the order for Madrid, Martha, M.D. (G 75760) on the Board's website.

MAKOUI, AMIR SHAHRAM, M.D. (A 75531), Lancaster, CA

No admissions but convicted of one misdemeanor count of inflicting a corporal injury resulting in a traumatic condition upon a person; one misdemeanor count of using force and violence upon the person of another; and two misdemeanor counts of violating a protective order. Revoked, stayed, placed on three years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, providing 80 hours of community services; completing an ethics course and an anger management course; submitting to a psychiatric evaluation; attending psychotherapy; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. January 31, 2020. View the decision and the order for Makoui, Amir Shahram, M.D. (A 75531) on the Board's website.

MANJARRES, BRIAN MICHAEL (A 100304), San Diego, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of five patients; incompetence in the care and treatment of four patients; and self-prescribing controlled substances. Surrender of License. January 1, 2020. View the decision and the order for Manjarres, Brian Michael (A 100304) on the Board's website.

MARSH, BRIAN T. (G 77041), Sebastopol, CA

No admissions but charged with being convicted of child cruelty/endangerment and driving with a blood alcohol content of .08% or more; used alcohol in such a manner as to be dangerous or injurious to himself, another person, or to the public; and has a condition affecting his ability to practice medicine safely. Surrender of License. December 31, 2019. View the decision and the order for Marsh, Brian T. (G 77041) on the Board's website.

MATHY, CHRISTIAN BERNARD (A 66142), Burlingame, CA

Unable to satisfy the terms and conditions of his Board-ordered probation. Surrender of License. December 20, 2019. View the decision and the order for Mathy, Christian Bernard (A 66142) on the Board's website.

MCCARRICK, JAMES WILLIAM III, M.D. (A 60133), Menlo Park, CA

Committed acts of sexual misconduct, gross negligence, and violating ethical standards in the care and treatment of one patient. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, notification to patients of probation status; completing an ethics course and a professional boundaries program; submitting to a psychiatric evaluation; attending psychotherapy; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 8, 2019. View the decision and the order for Mccarrick, James William Iii, M.D. (A 60133) on the Board's website.

MCGRATH, EILEEN MARIE, M.D. (G 51323), Santa Monica, CA

Public Letter of Reprimand issued pursuant to Business and Professions Code section 2233 for failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of three patients. January 29, 2020. View the decision and the order for Mcgrath, Eileen Marie, M.D. (G 51323) on the Board's website.

MENEZES, SUTTON NICOLE (A 54673), Redding, CA

Physician has a condition affecting her ability to practice medicine safely. Revoked. January 17, 2020. View the decision and the order for Menezes, Sutton Nicole (A 54673) on the Board's website.

MILLER, MICHAEL DOUGLAS (C 139329), Cleveland Heights, OH

Admitted to gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records, furnishing dangerous drugs without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication; and violating statutes regulating dangerous drugs in the care and treatment of one patient. Surrender of License. November 1, 2019. View the decision and the order for Miller, Michael Douglas (C 139329) on the Board's website.

MINEHART, ISAAC M., M.D. (A 44356), Arcadia, CA

No admissions but charged with repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of three patients. Must complete a prescribing practices course and a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. November 22, 2019. View the decision and the order for Minehart, Isaac M., M.D. (A 44356) on the Board's website.

MIR, DAVID, M.D. (A 96676), Laguna Niguel, CA

Admitted to being convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol and driving a motor vehicle with .08% or more, by weight, of alcohol in his blood, and used alcohol in a manner as to be dangerous or injurious to himself, another person, or to the public. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, abstaining from the use of controlled substances and alcohol; submitting to biological fluid testing; completing an ethics course; undergoing a clinical diagnostic evaluation; attending substance abuse support group meetings; obtaining a worksite monitor; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. January 2, 2020. View the decision and the order for Mir, David, M.D. (A 96676) on the Board's website.

MIRAKHOR, SOLEYMAN, M.D. (C 52017), Woodland Hills, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, incompetence, excessive prescribing, prescribing without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of four patients. Revoked, stayed, placed on seven years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, 30 day suspension; prohibited from ordering, prescribing dispensing, administering, or furnishing any controlled substances until successful completion of a clinical competence assessment program and a prescribing practices course; maintaining a record of all controlled substances ordered, prescribed, dispensed, administered, or possessed and any recommendations or approval to possess or cultivate marijuana; completing an education course, a prescribing practices course, a medical record keeping course and a clinical competence assessment program (condition precedent); notification to patients of probation status; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. January 3, 2020. View the decision and the order for Mirakhor, Soleyman, M.D. (C 52017) on the Board's website.

MITCHELL, JERRY, M.D. (G 55977), Sherman Oaks, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Revoked, stayed, placed on thirty-five months' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an education course, a medical record keeping course, and an ethics course; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 13, 2019. View the decision and the order for Mitchell, Jerry, M.D. (G 55977) on the Board's website.

MOAYERI, MOHAMMAD ALI (C 40554), Garfield Heights, OH

Disciplined by State Medical Board of Ohio for engaging in unprofessional conduct by prescribing controlled substances to a family member, and taking some of the medication he prescribed for self-use. Surrender of License. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Moayeri, Mohammad Ali (C 40554) on the Board's website.

MOTT, ROBERT ALAN (G 41724), Trinidad, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, excessive prescribing, prescribing without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Surrender of License. December 26, 2019. View the decision and the order for Mott, Robert Alan (G 41724) on the Board's website.

MULLER, JEFFERY ALAN, M.D. (G 52888), Corona, CA

No admissions but charged with repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of four patients. Must complete a prescribing practices course and a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. November 8, 2019. View the decision and the order for Muller, Jeffery Alan, M.D. (G 52888) on the Board's website.

NG, YOLANDA WAI (A 131737), Port Townsend, WA

Failed to comply with multiple terms of her Board-ordered probation. Revoked. November 22, 2019. View the decision and the order for Ng, Yolanda Wai (A 131737) on the Board's website.

OKHOVAT, MAHYAR, M.D. (A 85646), Encino, CA

No admissions but charged with repeated negligent acts and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete a prescribing practices course and a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. November 8, 2019. View the decision and the order for Okhovat, Mahyar, M.D. (A 85646) on the Board's website.

OSTOVAR, FARSHAD SIRJANI, M.D. (A 167627), Fresno, CA

No admissions but charged with failing to provide his decision to continue in the training program in the specified timeframe. Probationary license issued, placed on three years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, during the first two years of probation, applicant is prohibited from practicing medicine outside an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited postgraduate training program and must successfully complete 24 months of ACGME accredited postgraduate training in the same training; obtaining a practice monitor; completing an education course and a clinician-patient communication course; prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. January 17, 2020. View the decision and the order for Ostovar, Farshad Sirjani, M.D. (A 167627) on the Board's website.

PARKS, KERRI SHANE (A 65496), Pasadena, CA

No admissions but charged with having a condition affecting her ability to practice medicine safely. Surrender of License. November 1, 2019. View the decision and the order for Parks, Kerri Shane (A 65496) on the Board's website.

PARSONS, JOHN EDWIN, JR., M.D. (G 78940), El Centro, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, excessive prescribing, and incompetence in the care and treatment of five patients; and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, notification of employer; notification to patients of probation status; successfully completing a clinical competence assessment program; maintaining a record of all controlled substances ordered, prescribed, dispensed, administered, or possessed and any recommendations or approvals to possess or cultivate marijuana; completing an education course, a medical record keeping course, and an ethics course; and obtaining a practice and billing monitor. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Parsons, John Edwin, Jr., M.D. (G 78940) on the Board's website.

PIERCE, JOHN WINTHROP (G 45225), San Francisco, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of seven patients; and excessive prescribing and prescribing without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication in the care and treatment of five patients. Surrender of License. December 31, 2019. View the decision and the order for Pierce, John Winthrop (G 45225) on the Board's website.

RAND, JONATHAN DAVID (G 37418), Marina Del Rey, CA

No admissions but charged with repeated negligent acts and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Surrender of License. December 23, 2019. View the decision and the order of Rand, Jonathan David (G 37418) on the Board's website.

REYNOLDS, FRANK SULLIVAN, M.D. (G 44261), Sacramento, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence and repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an education course. Public Reprimand. January 2, 2020. View the decision and the order for Reynolds, Frank Sullivan, M.D. (G 44261) on the Board's website.

RIZKALLA, SUZANNE SOBHY-FARAG, M.D. (A 55643), Loma Linda, CA

No admissions but charged with repeated negligent acts, incompetence, excessive prescribing, prescribing to an addict, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Revoked, stayed, placed on thirty-five months’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, maintaining a record of all controlled substances ordered, prescribed, dispensed, administered, or possessed and any recommendations or approvals to possess or cultivate marijuana; completing a prescribing practices course, a medical record keeping course, and an ethics course; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants. November 22, 2019. View the decision and the order for Rizkalla, Suzanne Sobhy-Farag, M.D. (A 55643) on the Board's website.

ROMINE, KRISTINE ANN, M.D. (G 166912), Phoenix, AZ

No admissions but charged with failing to disclose required information to the Board regarding her malpractice settlement. Probationary license issued, placed on three years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an ethics course and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Romine, Kristine Ann, M.D. (G 166912) on the Board's website.

ROSE, CAROLYN JOAN (A 41263), Mariposa, CA

Unable to satisfy the terms and conditions of her Board-ordered probation. Surrender of License. November 20, 2019. View the decision and the order for Rose, Carolyn Joan (A 41263) on the Board's website.

ROTMAN, ARON LOUIS, M.D. (G 73976), Valley Village, CA

Disciplined by Florida for being convicted of three misdemeanor counts for failing to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of three patients. Public Reprimand. December 18, 2019. View the decision and the order for Rotman, Aron Louis, M.D. (G 73976) on the Board's website.

RYAN, JAMES MATTHEW CROWLEY (A 136356), Santee, CA

No admission but charged with sexual misconduct in the care and treatment of one patient; gross negligence and repeated negligence in the care and treatment of three patients; and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records and prescribing without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication in the care and treatment of two patients; and disciplined, restricted, or limitation imposed by Arizona. Revoked. January 31, 2020. View the decision and the order for Ryan, James Matthew Crowley (A 136356) on the Board's website.

SANDOVAL, MARIA ALEXANDRA, M.D. (A 167341), Oakland, CA

No admissions but charged with failing to disclose required information to the Board regarding issues that occurred during her training and documented concerns regarding her clinical performance. In addition, she has a condition impacting her ability to practice medicine safely. Probationary license issued, placed on three years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, during the first year of probation, she is prohibited from practicing medicine outside an ACGME accredited postgraduate training program and must successfully complete 12 months of ACGME accredited postgraduate training in the same training; complete a professional enhancement program; attend psychotherapy, completing an ethics course; prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 26, 2019. View the decision and the order for Sandoval, Maria Alexandra, M.D. (A 167341) on the Board's website.

SCHULMAN, MARTIN C., M.D. (G 58731), Cardiff By The Sea, CA

No admissions but charged with repeated negligent acts and failing to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an education course, prescribing practices course, and a medical records keeping course. Public Reprimand. January 2, 2020. View the decision and the order for Schulman, Martin C., M.D. (G 58731) on the Board's website.

SHARPE, BRETT KEITH, M.D. (A 166806), Tucson, AZ

No admissions but charged with unprofessional conduct for acts of dishonesty for not disclosing a conviction of operating a vehicle while impaired on his application for a medical license in California. Probationary license issued, placed on three years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an ethics course and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 22, 2019. View the decision and the order for Sharpe, Brett Keith, M.D. (A 166806) on the Board's website.

SOLIMAN, SAMI SORIAL, M.D. (A 53783), Redlands, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, excessive prescribing, failing to maintain adequate and accurate medical records, incompetence, and prescribing to an addict, in the care and treatment of one patient. Revoked, stayed, placed on three years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, maintaining a record of all controlled substances ordered, prescribed, dispensed, administered, or possessed and any recommendations or approvals to possess or cultivate marijuana; completing a prescribing practices course, a medical record keeping course, and an ethics course; obtaining a practice monitor; prohibited from practicing medicine or treating patients in an office setting, all treatment of patients shall be in a hospital setting; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants. November 1, 2019. View the decision and the order for Soliman, Sami Sorial, M.D. (A 53783) on the Board's website.

SPENCER, TODD DAVID (G 70273), La Quinta, CA

Unable to satisfy the terms and conditions of his Board-ordered probation. Surrender of License. November 1, 2019. View the decision and the order for Spencer, Todd David (G 70273) on the Board's website.

STANTON, PAUL ANDREW, M.D. (G 85199), Victorville, CA

No admissions but convicted of a misdemeanor charge of submitting false and fraudulent claims and dishonest or corrupt acts. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, providing 80 hours of community service; completing an ethics course; obtaining a billing monitor; and prohibited from submitting worker's compensation claims; after the effective date of this Decision, all patients being treated by Respondent shall be notified that Respondent is prohibited from submitting worker's compensation claims, and any new patients must be provided this notification at the time of their initial appointment; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 20, 2019. View the decision and the order for Stanton, Paul Andrew, M.D. (G 85199) on the Board's website.

STARK, BRUCE M., M.D. (G 72204), Toluca Lake, CA

No admissions but charged with repeated negligent acts and failing to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete a prescribing practices course and a medical records keeping course. Public Reprimand. December 13, 2019. View the decision and the order for Stark, Bruce M., M.D. (G 72204) on the Board's website.

SURYADEVARA, SAMPATH KUMAR, M.D. (C 50601), Cerritos, CA

No admissions but charged with repeated negligent acts, incompetence, improper prescribing without an appropriate prior examination and medical indication, excessive prescribing, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of three patients, gross negligence in the care and treatment of two patients, and prescribing to an addict and aiding the abetting the unlicensed practice of medicine in the care and treatment of one patient. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, prohibited from ordering, prescribing, dispensing, administering, furnishing, or possessing any controlled substances in Schedules II and III during the first two years of probation; maintaining a record of all controlled substances ordered, prescribed, dispensed, administered, or possessed and any recommendations or approvals to possess or cultivate marijuana; obtaining a practice monitor; successfully complete a clinical competence assessment program; notification to patients of probation status; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Suryadevara, Sampath Kumar, M.D. (C 50601) on the Board's website.

SWANSON, KEITH ROBERT (C 34400), Genoa, NV

No admissions but convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol on two occasions; used alcohol in such a manner as to be dangerous or injurious to himself, another person, or to the public. Surrender of License. December 23, 2019. View the decision and the order for Swanson, Keith Robert (C 34400) on the Board's website.

TABIBIAN, HOOSHANG, M.D. (A 40845), Maywood, CA

No admissions but charged with aiding and abetting the unlicensed practice of medicine, dishonest or corrupt acts, gross negligence, and repeated negligent acts. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, providing 100 hours of community service during the first two years of probation; completing an ethics course; prohibited from having any affiliation with or ownership of a medical spa or laser clinic or any similar type of facility; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 13, 2019. View the decision and the order for Tabibian, Hooshang, M.D. (A 40845) on the Board's website.

THOMAS, JEFFREY L., M.D. (A 67160), Fresno, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence and repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete a clinical competence assessment program. Public Reprimand. January 2, 2020. View the decision and the order for Thomas, Jeffrey L., M.D. (A 67160) on the Board's website.

THUMA, NATHAN H., M.D. (G 58451), St. Helena, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, incompetence, and failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of five patients; and prescribed without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication, and excessively prescribed controlled substances in the care and treatment of four patients. Revoked, stayed, placed on four years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, maintaining a record of all controlled substances ordered, prescribed, dispensed, administered, or possessed and any recommendations or approvals to possessor cultivate marijuana; completing an education course, a prescribing practices course, and a medical record keeping course; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 8, 2019. View the decision and the order for Thuma, Nathan H., M.D. (G 58451) on the Board's website.

TRAN, MICHAEL LONG, M.D. (G 85353), Santa Rosa, CA

Committed gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, prescribing without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication, excessively prescribed controlled substances, and failed to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of six patients; failed to provide proper supervision to physician assistants and nurse practitioners. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, maintaining a record of all controlled substances ordered, prescribed, dispensed, administered, or possessed and any recommendations or approvals to possessor cultivate marijuana; completing an education course, a prescribing practices course, a medical record keeping course, and an ethics course; obtaining a practice monitor; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants. November 8, 2019. View the decision and the order for Tran, Michael Long, M.D. (G 85353) on the Board's website.

TRUE, WAYNE STEWART, M.D. (G 62330), La Mesa, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, and failed to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of one patient. Must complete an education course, a prescribing practices course, and a medical record keeping course. Public Reprimand. December 18, 2019. View the decision and the order for True, Wayne Stewart, M.D. (G 62330) on the Board's website.

WEI, PETER TZUHSIANG, M.D. (A 166910), Syracuse, NY

No admissions but charged with failing to disclose required information to the Board regarding issues that occurred during his training and documented concerns regarding his clinical performance. Probationary license issued, placed on three years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an ethics course and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 27, 2019. View the decision and the order for Wei, Peter Tzuhsiang, M.D. (A 166910) on the Board's website.

WEST, ROBERT WILLIAM, M.D. (A 167342), Loma Linda, CA

No admissions but placed on an academic remediation plan for having clinical deficiencies during postgraduate training. Probationary license issued, placed on three years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, during the first year of probation, applicant is prohibited from practicing medicine outside an ACGME accredited postgraduate training program and must successfully complete 12 months of ACGME accredited postgraduate training in the same training; obtaining a practice monitor; prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 26, 2019. View the decision and the order for West, Robert William, M.D. (A 167342) on the Board's website.

WIMBLEY, MARK ANTHONY A., M.D. (G 75382), Irvine, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence in the care and treatment of four patients; repeated negligent acts in the care and treatment of 15 patients; prescribed or furnished controlled substances to person not under his treatment, prescribing without an appropriate prior medical examination or indication, failed to maintain adequate and accurate medical records in the care and treatment of 19 patients; and convicted of nine misdemeanor counts of prescribing a controlled substance without legitimate medical purpose. Revoked, stayed, placed on seven years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, surrendering of DEA permit prior to practicing medicine; prohibited from ordering, prescribing, dispensing, administering, furnishing, or possessing any controlled substances and from issuing an oral or written recommendation or approval to possess or cultivate marijuana; providing 40 hours of community service; completing an education course, prescribing practices course (condition met), medical record keeping course (condition met), and an ethics course (condition met); completing a clinical competence assessment program; obtaining a practice monitor; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. January 30, 2020. View the decision and the order for Wimbley, Mark Anthony A., M.D. (G 75382) on the Board's website.

YEE, CHRISTIE ELING CHU (A 121101), Anaheim, CA

Unable to satisfy the terms and conditions of her Board-ordered probation. Surrender of License. November 20, 2019. View the decision and the order for Yee, Christie Eling Chu (A 121101) on the Board's website.

YILMAZ GONZALEZ, LAL KAYE, M.D. (A 71198), Walnut Creek, CA

No admissions but charged with being convicted of a misdemeanor of driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage with an enhancement for a high blood alcohol content, and used alcohol in a manner as to be dangerous or injurious to herself, another person, or to the public. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, abstaining from the use of controlled substances and alcohol; submitting to a psychiatric evaluation; prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine; notification of employer; submitting to biological fluid testing; attending substance abuse support group meetings; obtaining a worksite monitor for substance abusing licensees; notification to patients of probation status; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. December 18, 2019. View the decision and the order for Yilmaz Gonzalez, Lal Kaye, M.D. (A 71198) on the Board's website.

ZAGHA, MOISE TOFIC, M.D. (A 34602), Encino, CA

No admissions but charged with gross negligence, repeated negligent acts, prescribing without an appropriate prior examination or indication, excessive prescribing, incompetence, failure to maintain adequate and accurate medical records, and violating statutes regulating controlled substances in the care and treatment of one patient. Revoked, stayed, placed on thirty-five months’ probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, completing an education course and an ethics course; obtaining a practice monitor; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. January 3, 2020. View the decision and the order for Zagha, Moise Tofic, M.D. (A 34602) on the Board's website.

ZIMMERMANN, KEVIN RAY, M.D. (A 143783), Sacramento, CA

Admitted to being disciplined by the Air Force for appropriating and self-administering Propofol from hospital supplies, while he was the only anesthesiologist on duty at the hospital. Revoked, stayed, placed on five years' probation with terms and conditions including, but not limited to, abstaining from the use of controlled substances and alcohol; completing an ethics course; attending psychotherapy; prohibited from engaging in the solo practice of medicine; notification of employer; submitting to biological fluid testing; attending substance abuse support group meetings; obtaining a worksite monitor; notification to patients of probation status; and prohibited from supervising physician assistants and advanced practice nurses. November 1, 2019. View the decision and the order for Zimmermann, Kevin Ray, M.D. (A 143783) on the Board's website.

Top